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Eczema – Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic medical condition that renders the skin itchy and red. It is also known as eczema. This condition is more common among children but it can develop at any age. A family history of hay fever or asthma can predispose an individual to developing atopic dermatitis. Rehydration treatments and self-care can in general alleviate the sensation of itching and prevent new flare-ups of the disease.

 

Diagnosis of Real Causes & Treatment of Eczema – Atopic Dermatitis

  • Gradual restoration of cellular function
  • Personalized therapeutic protocols, without chemical residues and excipients
  • Treating the real causes
  • Therapeutic formulas that work alone or in combination with any other medication
  • Adopting a Molecular / Therapeutic Nutrition Plan

 

eczema

 

The most common symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis are: itchy and red skin, dry and sensitive skin, cracked skin, small rough bumps on the skin, inflamed skin around the lips and /or thickened patches of raised skin.

Your Health Specialist will address a series of targeted questions to you, to assess whether your symptoms could be indicative of Atopic Dermatitis. Then your specialist may recommend a specialized blood test or other molecular-level diagnostic tests to identify possible hormonal and/or biochemical imbalances. In most cases a consultation with a Dermatologist may be recommended. Your personalized treatment plan will be based upon the diagnostic tests results, the symptoms described and your medical history overall.

 

This treatment plan may be accompanied by a Molecular Nutrition program that will be compiled after a distinct consultation with our Molecular Nutritionist and will aim towards achieving even higher levels of health and well-being along with alleviating not only the symptoms but the true causes of Atopic Dermatitis.

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References


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  • Kapoor R, Menon C, Hoffstad O, Bilker W, Leclerc P, Margolis DJ. The prevalence of atopic triad in children with physician-confirmed atopic dermatitis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2008;58(1):68-73.
  • Thyssen JP, Hamann CR, Linneberg A, et al. Atopic dermatitis is associated with anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation, but not with psychiatric hospitalization or suicide. Allergy. 2018;73(1):214-220.
  • Brunner PM, Silverberg JI, Guttman-Yassky E, et al. Increasing comorbidities suggest that atopic dermatitis is a systemic disorder. J Invest Dermatol. 2017;137(1):18-25.
  • Strom MA, Silverberg JI. Associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior with atopic disease in United States children. J Pediatr. 2016;174:247-253.e3.
  • Zheng T, Yu J, Oh MH, Zhu Z. The atopic march: progression from atopic dermatitis to allergic rhinitis and asthma. Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2011;3(2):67-73.
  • Huang R, Ning H, Shen M, Li J, Zhang J, Chen X. Probiotics for the treatment of atopic dermatitis in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2017;7:392.
  • Rusu E, Enache G, Cursaru R, et al. Prebiotics and probiotics in atopic dermatitis. Exp Ther Med. 2019;18(2):926-931.
  • Foolad N, Armstrong AW. Prebiotics and probiotics: the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis in children. Benef Microbes. 2014;5(2):151-160.
  • Ahn K. The role of air pollutants in atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;134(5):993-1000.
  • Han H, Roan F, Ziegler SF. The atopic march: current insights into skin barrier dysfunction and epithelial cell-derived cytokines. Immunol Rev. 2017;278(1):116-130.